What If Your Show Dates Coincided With Hurricane Irma?

As events unfolded ever so slowly in the Caribbean and Florida, who among event organizers didn’t think, “There, but for the grace of God, go…”?

The organizers of the Miami International Auto Show postponed their event. Surf Expo in Orlando closed a day early.

Shortly before Hurricane Sandy a few years ago, I was headed to a long-planned event in New York, only to be stopped just minutes before I was to get on the plane. Most attendees for this particular show were traveling from the Northeast and had not yet left their homes when the decision was made to cancel, but a few dozen who didn’t get the message in time spent several days cooped up in a mid-Manhattan hotel.

What would you do if your show had the unfortunate pleasure of sitting right in the eye of a potential major natural disaster?

First off, don’t pretend — at least to yourself and your team — that it’s not about the money, because it is.

The better angel hovering just beyond your right shoulder is worried about people’s safety. But the realistic business person hovers over your left shoulder fretting about refunds, cancellation fees and busted budgets.

Even though you don’t want to, think about this ahead of time. Have a plan that, if you’re fortunate, you never have to execute regarding what you’ll do if you find yourself a few days out from the event and you — along with your sponsors and attendees — are learning about an impending disaster.

What would or could you do about rescheduling if necessary? What does the fine print in your contracts with vendors say about the financial implications of a sudden cancellation or an “act of God”? How far are the bulk of your attendees traveling and what does that tell you about how much time you have to make a final decision to go forward or cancel?

Thinking about all this in advance means you can save time changing plans on the spot at the last tension-filled minute.

Do your best during the registration process to assure you have reliable contact information for attendees and exhibitors if and when you need to get in touch with them immediately. Start communicating with them even before you’ve made your final decision about what to do.

Then be available when they start calling, texting and e-mailing you in those days when you’ve got a million other things to think about at the same time.

Do these simple things and when you make your decision about which path to take in the face of a potential disaster — cancel, reschedule, fly blind — you’ll do so with the confidence that will compel your event participants to trust you did the right thing for them.

Michael Hart is an event consultant and conference content professional. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com, @michaelgenehart or 323-441-9654.

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Has Comic-Con Jumped the Shark?

For several years now, pundits like me have showered praise on the visionaries who mount events like International Comic-Con and SXSW.

A visit to this year’s Comic-Con in San Diego might introduce the hint of a suggestion that the popular culture extravaganza may have finally outgrown even its own image of itself.

What has always been notable about these events is that they do not just satisfy the attendees who are at the show, but create an environment in which attendees and media spread the message sponsors and exhibitors have throughout the world.

Long ago, studios and game makers started renting space in other non-Comic-Con venues, including hotels and restaurants, to display their products because there simply wasn’t enough room at the San Diego Convention Center.

This year, however, it seemed that some kind of critical mass was reached and the impression of many was that there was so much going on elsewhere that there was little need for rank-and-file attendees to pay the $220 registration fee.

If you wanted to experience a promotion for HBO’s “Westworld,” you had to take a 10-block walk away from the convention center (and plenty of fans did).

The same was true for fans of “Mr. Robot,” “Blade Runner,” “Game of Thrones,” “Pokemon” and dozens of others.

Chuck Rozanski of Mile High Comics told the Wall Street Journal he was abandoning his booth in the convention center exhibit hall after 44 years since his most devoted fans didn’t plan to be there anyway.

To be sure, the programming for the main event went on as always with fans waiting for hours to get into the highest-profile conference sessions. And I’m sure Comic-Con organizers had no problem meeting their financial goals.

However, I also know that each year now studios and game makers take a little longer and think a little harder before they make the decision about how much of their resources to commit to Comic-Con.

At what point do events like Comic-Con and SXSW lose the ability to accomplish the goals their stakeholders originally set out for them — including their financial goals?

What’s next for the events industry after Comic-Con?

Michael Hart is a conference content professional and business consultant who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com, @michaelgenehart  or 323-441-9654.

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Emerald Expositions’ decision to move the Outdoor Retailer events out of Salt Lake City, accompanied almost simultaneously by a similar decision by the organizers of the North American Handmade Bicycle Show, because of the Utah state governor’s environmental politics seems a bit too convenient.

It reminds me of the commercials earlier this week during the Academy Awards by companies like Revlon, General Motors and Cadillac trying to suggest they share the same social justice values as their customers, when the fact is they are trying their best to sell their products.

The reality is that Outdoor Retailer’s organizers have wanted to move out of the Salt Palace Convention Center to a city with a venue large enough to accommodate a fast-growing show for 20 years. It’s been hampered by the fact that Outdoor Retailer’s attendees and exhibitors simply like Salt Lake and Utah. The convention center and local authorities called its bluff about 10 years ago with a venue expansion, primarily to accommodate Outdoor Retailer.

The expansion, a decade along, still isn’t enough to accommodate the show. Good for Emerald Expositions! It’s built a successful event. But its motives in justifying a move out of Salt Lake are a little transparent.

The company made it clear not long ago it was looking at other cities for the show, even before it announced that Gov. Gary Herbert’s efforts to limit federal protection of the Bears Ear National Monument (please tell me you’ve heard of it) was their line in the sand.

The draconian measures being taken by the Trump administration that are contrary to the values many of us share are bad enough.  Now companies are taking advantage of the 1984-like atmosphere we are in to justify business decisions they know will be unpopular with their customers.

Michael Hart is a business consultant and writer who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com.

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