What If Your Show Dates Coincided With Hurricane Irma?

As events unfolded ever so slowly in the Caribbean and Florida, who among event organizers didn’t think, “There, but for the grace of God, go…”?

The organizers of the Miami International Auto Show postponed their event. Surf Expo in Orlando closed a day early.

Shortly before Hurricane Sandy a few years ago, I was headed to a long-planned event in New York, only to be stopped just minutes before I was to get on the plane. Most attendees for this particular show were traveling from the Northeast and had not yet left their homes when the decision was made to cancel, but a few dozen who didn’t get the message in time spent several days cooped up in a mid-Manhattan hotel.

What would you do if your show had the unfortunate pleasure of sitting right in the eye of a potential major natural disaster?

First off, don’t pretend — at least to yourself and your team — that it’s not about the money, because it is.

The better angel hovering just beyond your right shoulder is worried about people’s safety. But the realistic business person hovers over your left shoulder fretting about refunds, cancellation fees and busted budgets.

Even though you don’t want to, think about this ahead of time. Have a plan that, if you’re fortunate, you never have to execute regarding what you’ll do if you find yourself a few days out from the event and you — along with your sponsors and attendees — are learning about an impending disaster.

What would or could you do about rescheduling if necessary? What does the fine print in your contracts with vendors say about the financial implications of a sudden cancellation or an “act of God”? How far are the bulk of your attendees traveling and what does that tell you about how much time you have to make a final decision to go forward or cancel?

Thinking about all this in advance means you can save time changing plans on the spot at the last tension-filled minute.

Do your best during the registration process to assure you have reliable contact information for attendees and exhibitors if and when you need to get in touch with them immediately. Start communicating with them even before you’ve made your final decision about what to do.

Then be available when they start calling, texting and e-mailing you in those days when you’ve got a million other things to think about at the same time.

Do these simple things and when you make your decision about which path to take in the face of a potential disaster — cancel, reschedule, fly blind — you’ll do so with the confidence that will compel your event participants to trust you did the right thing for them.

Michael Hart is an event consultant and conference content professional. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com, @michaelgenehart or 323-441-9654.

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How Events Can Beat Digital Competitors at Their Own Game

You don’t need me to tell you how frustrating it is to have a potential exhibitor tell you they’re putting more of their marketing budget into digital channels and less into events – therefore, “Check with me next year.”
Nevertheless, we all know even a mediocre event can give marketers a few things they will never be able to get from the Googles, LinkedIns, Facebooks and Amazons of the world. Where we have failed is in communicating that value proposition.
Certainly, the ground has shifted over the last 15 or so years. In his July 15 Wall Street Journal article, Jonathan Taplin traces the path some of the mega-tech companies have taken over the past decade and a half and compares it to the paths our best-known creative industries have taken.
Google’s ad revenue has grown from $1.6 billion in 2000 to $79.4 billion last year.
LinkedIn hasn’t been around as long and is not nearly the monster Google is. But it went at lightning speed from generating $155 million in all of 2011 to $975 million in the first quarter of this year (coincidentally, its first full quarter as a Microsoft property).
Conversely, newspaper ad revenue dropped from $65.8 billion in 2000 to $23.6 billion in 2013, the last year figures were available. Sales of recorded music went from approximately $20 billion a year in 2000 to $8 billion last year.
What is the difference between these rising and falling industries?
Google and LinkedIn are technology platforms that collect and sell data. Newspapers and recording companies provide content. If balance sheets send messages, this one is simple: The platform providers, not the content providers, are making the money.
So what can you do to take advantage of this disruption? Make sure your exhibitors know you can provide the buyers they’re looking for in a way that a data-collecting platform can’t. Then secure those buyers by offering them content so compelling buyers-slash-attendees know your event is the only place this year they are going to get everything they need to run their businesses.
Tell everybody this is where they need to be for the latest information on their industry, the products and services they need right now to innovate their businesses, and the connections they must make to be successful.
Don’t be a platform! Be a community builder and content provider…then watch the rest unfold.
Michael Hart is a business consultant and writer who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com or 323-394-0902.

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