SSmall Event Organizer, Meet the Micro-Influencer

If you’re the organizer of a 50- or 60-booth trade show, what do you say when an exhibitor asks you what kind of media attention you’ll be able to get them?

Typically, there’s a lot of clearing the throat and changing the subject. After all, this is not International Comic-Con you’re running here.

You don’t have the star power to attract the attention of television and newspaper reporters. There will be no reality TV stars making show floor appearances. You don’t have anything a blogger would want to write about.

Or do you?

It’s true that the digital age of marketing has given rise to the celebrity blogger, the person who wanders around the world writing about what he or she observes for millions of faithful readers.

But the evolution of social media, with its infinite diversity, has introduced us to the “micro-influencer,” the blogger who has earned the trust of a small but passionate audience, the writer who can draw that audience’s attention to your event, and who would be flattered by an invitation.

Here’s what micro-influencers can offer even the smallest event and what they can do to deliver your event’s message to a further-flung audience.

First, engagement. Studies – and common sense — tell us that as a blogger’s number of followers rises, the likes and comments, the number of people paying close attention to what they’re writing, diminishes.

On the other hand, the micro-influencer of a smaller niche audience is “just like one of us,” can make a deeper personal connection and engage in a conversation with his or her followers, not just make readers aware of a brand.

Second, authenticity. Readers know when a message is insincere and are quick to reject it. The micro-influencer, who is on the ground writing, has that authentic voice. He or she is “just like one of us” and their insights can be trusted.

Third, affordability! How much would it cost you to get a celebrity or a high-profile speaker that you hope would draw some media attention to your show? And how many free passes to the show could you give to micro-influencers for the same amount of money?

Fine, you say, but where do these micro-influencers come from?

Look at your own social media activity. Who’s following you closely and frequently posting insightful comments?

In your own social media messages, use hashtags and keywords related to your industry. If you run a plastics show, for instance, try “#plasticsblogger” or “#plasticsgeek.” See who you hear from.

Roam around Google and look for the niche bloggers who are covering your show’s field of interest and your exhibiting companies.

Finally, there are influence-marketing tools and blogger networks out there. I’ll leave it to you to find the most responsible vendors you know to find them.

We all know digital tools can enhance events. We also know some of the technology with the greatest “wow” factor is not accessible to the smallest of shows.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t find a way to, here and there, take advantage of the ever-changing digital age.

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How Your Event Can Replace the Mainstream Media

Whether I like it or not, much of the world is unhappy with the mainstream news media today.

As somebody who spent the first part of his professional life as a journalist, I have a perspective on the problems, the causes, the impacts…but that is a blog post for another day.

I am disappointed in much of the B-to-B media as well, which focuses more and more on what advertisers and sponsors want to the detriment of industries’ thirst for information.

I am even more disappointed in the way both the mainstream and B-to-B media have abandoned their roles as community builders. Starting way back with my first job as the editor of a weekly newspaper in a small suburb to my most recent role as the editor of a multi-platform B-to-B organization, I have always thought of myself as somebody whose responsibility it was to provide the “meeting place” for a community, the vehicle it uses to learn about itself.

Media organizations, large and small, have for the most part abandoned the following four tenets I think are necessary to be a true community builder – the good news is that they are tenets your event could adopt:

  1. The news report: A community-building news organization provides the story, the facts that make up the community or the industry – who did what, when, where and how.
  2. The data bank: In my newspaper days, we called it the “refrigerator door file”: Who won the track meet and what was their time, which house on your block sold and for how much. The story of a community told in the numbers.
  3. The honor roll: Who won the awards presented by the industry association? Who’s doing something interesting that nobody knows about yet? Who are the stars of the smallest companies and the biggest?
  4. The industry op-ed page: What do members of your industry think about what’s going on? What are the issues important to them today?

And, by the way, the news organizations that fulfilled these four community-building imperatives also managed to make a good living selling ads while providing a public service.

As the economics of the media business have changed and media organizations have begun to shrink from their responsibilities, they present events with opportunities to take their place as an industry’s community builder – and to sell a few sponsorships and booths along the way.

  1. With your conference content, you give your community the vital information it needs.
  2. With the data and research you and your exhibitors compile, you provide your industry with its “refrigerator door file.”
  3. With your awards programs and ceremonies, you honor the heroes of your community.
  4. And you carefully select the keynoters and speakers that constitute your industry’s live “op-ed page.”

Event organizers have never had a better opportunity than today to put themselves at the center of the industry community they serve – and make a few dollars at the same time.

Michael Hart is a business consultant and writer who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com.

 

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