Are Tech Vendors Taking Over the Events Industry?We’re moving into the last days of February, which means we are finally moving out of the phase in which we read lots of articles and blog posts titled something along the lines of “X Number of Things That Will Rock the Events Industry in 2017.”

We’re moving into the last days of February, which means we are finally moving out of the phase in which we read lots of articles and blog posts titled something along the lines of “X Number of Things That Will Rock the Events Industry in 2017.”

Don’t get me wrong: I’ve written my share of these stories myself over the years. Unfortunately, this year I feel like I saw a disproportionate number of articles clearly written by somebody with one technology or the other to pitch. This “trend” may have reached the tipping point for me earlier this week when I read a blog post pointing out why live streaming would improve live participation in events…right after reading one that said it would not.

I’m as much in favor of using technology to enhance the experience of attendees and, yes, help us make more money as anybody. But the growing penetration of technology into the events industry cannot be driven by the technology vendors.

There is no longer a one-size-fits-all tradeshow or convention. Each organization, industry and community has a different reason for meeting.

Using the example of live streaming as just one example – because it’s fresh in my mind – widespread live streaming makes perfect sense for the new, improved E3 or a Comic-Con type event because one of the goals with these kinds of events is to act as a vehicle to communicate messages or sell products to audiences beyond the venue.

However, there are other events that still rely on a certain sense of exclusivity, that produce valuable content that can be repackaged and resold in another form – like live streaming.

The larger business world that the events industry serves is undergoing constant transformation, and each event organizer must be aware of what is happening in their little universe and why.

Witness the recent effort by Kraft Heinz to acquire Unilever, the shifts in the consumer packaged goods market that motivated the effort, and then the sudden decision to back out.

Just imagine the mood changes event organizers in the food retailing space went through for a day or two there, and how they’re still filled with anxiety about what’s next for them and their shows.

Event organizers everywhere today must find the most creative solutions possible to maintain relevant to their audiences. And silly articles about how a particular technology will or will not serve them don’t help much.

Michael Hart is a business consultant and writer who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com.

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With Globalization Era Ending, U.S. Event Organizers Have Their Work Cut Out

blog-imageIf a politician once famously said, “All politics are local,” 2017 might be the year we start saying, “All tradeshows are local too.”

For more than a decade, smart U.S. tradeshow organizers were forming joint ventures with organizers in Europe, Asia and Latin America. They were investing in exhibitions companies all over the world and the largest trade events in Shanghai, Hannover and Rio de Janeiro had huge U.S. pavilions.

If the globalization of the tradeshow industry has not come to an abrupt halt, it is beginning to fade into the distant past as corporate exhibitors try to make up for declines in their international sales by reintroducing themselves to domestic buyers.

A few things have happened that just about everybody knows about:

  • The World Trade Organization says global trade will grow at its slowest rate this year since 2007.
  • Global Trade Alert counts 338 trade protection actions by governments around the world this year, up from 61 in the same period in 2009.
  • China’s gross domestic product has waned, along with its need for commodities and equipment.
  • Finally, regardless of who is the next U.S. president, it looks like there will be no Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement and, whether the American public understands the implications or not, fewer and fewer trade treaties with other countries.

In other words, global commerce is slowing down, at least for a while. Companies in every country – not just the U.S. – seem to be battening down the hatches for…what?

That’s not clear, but, if you are a tradeshow organizer who serves a market that’s global reach is shrinking, you’ve got to think fast.

Remember what I wrote a few paragraphs earlier: Corporate exhibitors must try to make up for declines in their international sales by reintroducing themselves to their domestic buyers.

Now is the time to remind those exhibitors of how many buyers you can draw within a single day’s drive of your event. Now it the time to reinforce for them via content marketing the value of the domestic industry your show serves. And now is the time to tell the once-regular attendees who haven’t been around for a few years that you want them back.

Michael Hart is a business consultant and writer who focuses on the events industry. He can be reached at michaelhart@michaelgenehart.com.

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